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July 2014
05
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July 2014
02
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Apollo || God of the Sun

The son of Zeus and Leto, and the twin brother of Artemis. Apollo was the god of music (principally the lyre, and he directed the choir of the Muses) and also of prophecy, colonization, medicine, archery (but not for war or hunting), poetry, dance, intellectual inquiry and the carer of herds and flocks. He was also a god of light, known as “Phoebus” (radiant or beaming, and he was sometimes identified with Helios the sun god). He was also the god of plague and was worshiped as Smintheus (from sminthos, rat) and as Parnopius (from parnops, grasshopper) and was known as the destroyer of rats and locust, and according to Homer’s Iliad, Apollo shot arrows of plague into the Greek camp. Apollo being the god of religious healing would give those guilty of murder and other immoral deeds a ritual purification. Sacred to Apollo are the swan (one legend says that Apollo flew on the back of a swan to the land of the Hyperboreans, he would spend the winter months among them), the wolf and the dolphin. His attributes are the bow and arrows, on his head a laurel crown, and the cithara (or lyre) and plectrum. But his most famous attribute is the tripod, the symbol of his prophetic powers.

Apollo could also be ruthless when he was angered. The mortal Niobe, boasted to Apollo’s mother Leto, that she had fourteen children (in some versions six or seven), which must make her more superior than Leto, who had only bore two. Apollo greatly angered by this slew her sons, and Artemis killed Niobe’s daughters. Niobe wept so much that she turned into a pillar of stone. Apollo was infuriated when the satyr Marsyas challenged Apollo to music contest. After winning the competition, Apollo had Marsyas flayed alive, for being so presumptuous, as to challenge a god.

In art Apollo is at most times depicted as a handsome young man, clean shaven and carrying either a lyre, or his bow and arrows. There are many sculptures of Apollo and one of the most famous is the central figure from the west pediment of the Temple of Zeus, at Olympia, showing Apollo declaring victory in favor of the Lapiths in their struggle against the Centaurs.

July 2014
01
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facina-oris:

MYTHOLOGY MEME - [9/?] GREEK GODS/GODDESSES: APOLLO

"Phoebos Apollo, radiant and shining archer,

Pythian Apollo, Lord of Delphi and oracles,

Delian Apollo, Lord of the Island of Delos,

Delphinius,

Averter of evil, Rescuer, Protector of strangers,

Divine healer, Far-shooter.

Beautiful, terrible god of truth and light.”

July 2014
01
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facina-oris:

the seven deadly sins

w r a t h ;

May 2014
27
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patrocluz:

MYTHOLOGY MEME(2/4) Titans

In Greek mythology, ATLAS is the personified quality of endurance. In one tradition, Atlas led the Titanes in a rebellion against Zeus and was condemned to bear the heavens upon his shoulders. In another, he was said to have been appointed guardian of the pillars which held earth and sky asunder. He was also the god who instructed mankind in the art of astronomy, a tool which was used by sailors in navigation and farmers in measuring the seasons. These roles were often combined and Atlas becomes the god who turns the heaven on their axis, causing the stars to revolve. 

May 2014
13
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sovietcop:

persephone / figures of myth

sovietcop:

persephone / figures of myth

April 2014
25
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Orpheus & EurydiceOrpheus sang and played so beautifully that he coaxed a nymph from her tree - the nymph was called Eurydice and she became Orpheus’ wife. He told her not to go into the forest for fear that she would wish to leave him once more for her home - but she did go, and a satyr played a trick on her in which she wound up being bitten by a poisonous snake and dying. Orpheus, in his love for her, went down into the Underworld to find her. There he made a deal with Hades that he could keep Eurydice with him as long as he could walk back out of the Underworld and not look at her - she would walk behind him so he could not see her, and she would not make any sound, not breath nor footstep. As they neared the realm of the living once more, Orpheus could not help himself and turned to steal a glimpse at his wife, who then flew back into the Underworld forever.

Orpheus & Eurydice

Orpheus sang and played so beautifully that he coaxed a nymph from her tree - the nymph was called Eurydice and she became Orpheus’ wife. He told her not to go into the forest for fear that she would wish to leave him once more for her home - but she did go, and a satyr played a trick on her in which she wound up being bitten by a poisonous snake and dying. Orpheus, in his love for her, went down into the Underworld to find her. There he made a deal with Hades that he could keep Eurydice with him as long as he could walk back out of the Underworld and not look at her - she would walk behind him so he could not see her, and she would not make any sound, not breath nor footstep. As they neared the realm of the living once more, Orpheus could not help himself and turned to steal a glimpse at his wife, who then flew back into the Underworld forever.

April 2014
16
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belerand:

mythology - undines or water nymphs

The origin of the Undines (or Ondines) can best be traced all the way back to ancient Greece wherein mythology cites a clan of nymphs called Oceanides claimed the waters of the world as their home. The water nymphs or water spirits, belong to the Water Elemental, are are usually found in forest pools and waterfalls. They are said to have beautiful voices, which can be sometime heard singing over the sound of water that entices those that hear it. These beings are believed to be the daughters of Titan and his wife Tethys. Their presence in the oceans was legendary among seafarers. Mostly beneficent, Oceanides would aid water-travelers in navigation and provide safe sea-ways.In European lore, Undines are fabled to be the wandering spirits of love-lorn women.  According to some legends, Undines can receive a soul when they marry a human man and bear his child. This aspect of them has them to be a popular subject motif for romantic and tragic literature. Often with sailors being drawn to them by their tears of sorrow that composed the salty seas when wept having lost at love. Tales indicate that these female water spirits are enchantingly beautiful and reputed to be relatively benign, however, like most female spirits they’ve got a temper when crossed and can be force to be reckoned with.

March 2014
29
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brohirrim:

Some of my favorite queens - Part 1/?

  • Boudicca - Celtic Queen of the Iceni Tribe, Britannia - died AD 60 or 61
  • Theodora - Empress of the Byzantine Empire - circa AD 500 - 548
  • Margaret I - Queen of Denmark, Norway, and Sweden - 1353 -1412
  • Christina - Queen of Swedes, Goths, and Vandals - 1626 - 1689
  • Anne - Queen of Great Britain - 1665 - 1714
  • Wilhelmina - Queen of the Netherlands - 1880 - 1965
March 2014
27
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lockedinafourtris:

Mythology Meme || Favorite Goddesses [2/10] || Isis

She was worshiped as the ideal mother and wife as well as the patroness of nature and magic. She was the friend of slaves, sinners, artisans and the downtrodden, but she also listened to the prayers of the wealthy, maidens, aristocrats and rulers. Isis is also known as protector of the dead and goddess of children. {x}

lockedinafourtris:

Mythology Meme || Favorite Goddesses [2/10] || Isis

She was worshiped as the ideal mother and wife as well as the patroness of nature and magic. She was the friend of slaves, sinners, artisans and the downtrodden, but she also listened to the prayers of the wealthy, maidens, aristocrats and rulers. Isis is also known as protector of the dead and goddess of children. {x}